The Founding Fathers Would Vote For Trump, Part I: Alexander Hamilton

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By Brett MacDonald AMERICA’S FREEDOM FIGHTERS

What Would Our Founding Fathers And Framers Think Of Donald J. Trump?

Part I: Hamilton’s Perdition

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“After the unequivocal experience of the inefficacy of the subsisting federal government, you are called upon deliberate on a new Constitution for the United States of America.”

 

– Alexander Hamilton, Federalist Paper #1

 

So began the greatest piece of political theory ever crafted by any group of Americans.  It was a time of great peril, of seemingly unconquerable divisive factionalism, and of great uncertainty.  It was a time very much like today, and given what we know it is likely that the framers and founders would look on our current position with much sympathy, yet utter disappointment.

 

Today we are not called upon to deliberate on a new Constitution, nor are our lines of demarcation so neatly drawn between Federalists and Antifederalists, yet here we are X years later, every bit as indecisive as our forefathers.  And we should be, since now we are called upon to deliberate on a question of such import, that the fate of not just the American people, but of all men living under the guise of sovereignty yet shackled by the chains of a tyrannous elite.  We must decide whether to embrace the cold calloused hands of the status quo, or to boldly venture down a path that is well-marked by the wisdom of our ancestors, yet largely untraveled in recent memories.

 

We must decide whether we are for Trump of for Clinton.

 

We must decide whether we are for innovation or for repetition.

 

We must decide if we wish to seize the reins of destiny or listen–again–to the ugly clamor of history as it rhymes once more and possibly for the remainder of this great nation’s existence.

 

We must decide, but we need not decide alone. We have all the information and guidance needed to determine our path.  But we wont find that guidance behind the visage of a South African expat, or between the jarring mandibles of a horrid British beast with an HBO special.  We won’t find it hidden in the sofa cushions in the over-packed studio apartment of an anime-haired “after-berner,” suffering from the inevitable depression from a post-mortem campaign failure.

 

We will find it in history, and the wisdom of history will find itself in Trump.

 

Let’s return to the text that began this discussion.

 

Hamilton continued: “It has been frequently remarked that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend for their political constitutions on accident and force.”

 

Now, Hamilton is a particularly intriguing American forefather in that his statements have been utilized by the factitious dissenters known as the “#NeverTrump” movement.  These elitists, through their duplicitous schemes and serialized failures have attempted to thwart democracy, sabotage their fellow party members, and disrupt the campaign of the people’s chosen candidate.

 

It seems clear that those among the #NeverTrump crowd do not believe that “societies of men are really capable…of establishing government from reflection and choice,” and rather than risk the unbridled masses making a poor decision, have opted to resort to, “accident and force.”

 

Rather, when turning to Hamilton, they select a quote from one of his lowest moments. Now, Hamilton is a man worthy of endless admiration and respect–as all founders and framers ought to be, but he was human.  Perhaps the most crippling facet of his humanity was his overbearing pride–pride that eventually found Hamilton mortally wounded at the opposing end of Andrew Burr’s smoking gun.

 

It was Hamilton’s pride that placed Burr into the high office of the Vice Presidency, and it was pride that led him to death in a duel, and pride that led his son to follow his footsteps into the next world shortly after him.

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So what prideful quote to the #NeverTrump cohorts turn to? The following:

 

“If we must have an enemy at the head of Government, let it be one whom we can oppose, and for whom we are not responsible, who will not involve our party in the disgrace of his foolish and bad measures.”

 

When Hamilton wrote this, he was advocating for the betrayal of his fellow party member John Adams.  Much like the #NeverTrump minions, Hamilton suffered from a bruised ego and overbearing pride.  With the internal feuding between Hamilton and Adams, the opposing party led by Thomas Jefferson, would secure the presidency for their leader.  Aaron Burr, for his part, became the Vice President.

 

 

 

Hamilton’s party lost the election and not long thereafter, Hamilton lost his life in a duel.  The duel was also the cause of his ego and pride. Whom was that duel with? Aaron Burr.  By sabotaging Adams at the cost of empowering Burr, Hamilton had sealed his fate and set himself on a course for mortal collision.  Rather than empower his own friendly rival, he decided to hand over control to his ideological enemy–for personal gain.hamjeffdivided

 

Today, the #NeverTrump thugs are attempting to make history rhyme. Rather than allow cooler heads to prevail, they prefer the toxic tantrum and juvenile behavior.  They are not Hamilton at his best while writing the Federalist Papers–they are Hamilton at his worst. 

 

Hamilton at his best would vote Trump over Hillary.

At his worst, Hamilton would be dead.

 

This was Part I of a series that questions whether founders would support Clinton or Trump. It was written by Brett MacDonald.

If you enjoyed this piece and want to hear more from Brett Mac, follow him onTwitter or Facebook, and visit his website: PoliticalWave. If you did not enjoy this piece, send him hate mail.

 

God Bless.

VOTE FOR DONALD J. TRUMP! TOGETHER WE WILL MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!

Dean James III% AMERICA’S FREEDOM FIGHTERS

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