ISIS Scumbag Gives Friends His ‘Special JIHAD Pills’, Moments Later THIS Happens

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Dean James III% AMERICA’S FREEDOM FIGHTERS –

Salahuddin, IRAQ — An Islamic State militant killed three of his fellow terrorists after he took drugs in east of Salahuddin province, according to local sources.

AlSumaria News quoted the source as saying that “ISIS member killed three of his companions in the vicinity of Mutaibija, in east of Salahuddin after taking drugs, called pink pills.”

“The accident is the second of its kind this month,” the source, who preferred anonymity, said. “The pink pills are widely spread among ISIS fighters. The pills can make the militants fearless, thus they are highly used ahead of any armed attack.”

Occasional attacks have been witnessed in Mutaibija by Islamic State against government and paramilitary troops deployments since Iraqi forces, backed by a U.S.-led coalition and PMUs, launched a major offensive to retake areas occupied by IS since 2014, Iraqi News reports.

News reports earlier this month mentioned that ISIS emir in Makhoul was killed along with his brother, while three other militants were wounded as an armed militant shot them after taking the pills, which turn them to drug-crazed killing machines.

Last Friday, a local source told AlSumaria News that the group detained in Hawija, southwest Kirkuk, one of its prominent doctors, who promotes for the pink pills.

WOW! ISIS savages on some kind of super drug! That’s insane.

Newsweek reports that investigators across Europe have intercepted thousands of Captagon pills, an amphetamine-based drug popular with the Islamic State militant group. Nicknamed “the jihadists’ drug,” Captagon keeps users awake for long periods of time, dulls pain and creates a sense of euphoria. According to one former militant, ISIS “gave us drugs, hallucinogenic pills that would make you go to battle not caring if you live or die.” Given similar testimony from other fighters, experts say it seems likely that the hallucinogenic pills the militant took were Captagon.

Captagon is one of the brand names for the drug fenethylline, a combination of amphetamine and theophylline that relaxes the muscle around the lungs and is used to treat breathing problems. A German company first synthesized fenethylline in 1961, and when it discovered the drug improved alertness, doctors began prescribing it to treat narcolepsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Though generally without side effects, says Dr. Raj Persaud, a fellow at the London-based Royal College of Psychiatrists, overuse can cause extreme depression, tiredness, insomnia, heart palpitations and, in rare cases, blindness and heart attacks. In the 1980s, when the drug’s addictiveness became clear, the United States and the World Health Organization listed it as a controlled substance, and it is now illegal to buy and sell throughout most of the world.

Invented in Germany in the 1960s to treat attention and sleep disorders, and highly addictive, Captagon was banned throughout most of the world in the 1980s.

The use of drugs in war has a long history. The ancient Greeks, the Vikings, U.S. Civil War soldiers and the Nazis all relied on drugs—wine, mushrooms, morphine and methamphetamines, respectively—to get them through the horror of battle. “The holy grail that armies around the world have been looking for is a drug that gives people courage,” says Persaud, and Captagon comes close. “It doesn’t give you distilled courage, but it gives you a tendency to want to keep going and impaired judgment, so you don’t consider whether you’re scared or not,” he says. “You feel euphoria. You don’t feel pain. You could say it’s courage without the judgment.” For a fighter in a war so brutally waged, the benefits of that are clear.

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